Regeneration: Los Angeles Food Policy Council Discusses Healing and Transforming the Food System

Last week, the Los Angeles Food Policy Council (LAFPC) held a community networking event on the concept of regeneration, a broad idea that addresses healing and transforming our food system, and encompasses health, access, human rights, social justice, and animal welfare.  In its description of the event, the LAFPC wrote, “At LAFPC, we envision regeneration as a paradigm shift–one that goes beyond extraction, beyond inputs and outputs and even beyond sustainability. To be regenerative, our food systems need to not only feed people, but restore our planet. Regenerative food systems give birth to new opportunities for transforming our earth, our communities and the people who inhabit them.”

The program included talks by Clare Fox, the Executive Director of the L.A. Food Policy Council, and Gunnar Lovelace, the co-founder and co- CEO of Thrive Market, an online wholesale buying club for organic and natural foods, and “learning hubs,” which divided the attendees into small groups to discuss how regeneration resonated with various aspects of the food system.

The concept of regeneration goes beyond “organic,” “clean,” “natural,” and even beyond “sustainable,” and the conversation at the event ranged from how to indicate such a concept to consumers, to how to create incentives for big agriculture to embrace regeneration, and whether change would start at the individual or systemic level, or both.

To see more LAFPC events, see their website, here.

Los Angeles Food Policy Tracker 2018

I am excited to share that the Resnick Program and the Los Angeles Food Policy Council have published the third Los Angeles Food Policy Tracker, compiled by Ellison Griep, who spent the summer working with both the Resnick Program and the Los Angeles Food Policy Council.

The Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy and the Los Angeles Food Policy Council actively follow Los Angeles food policy actions. In the Los Angeles Food Policy Tracker 2018, substantial policy actions undertaken at both the City and County level are identified. Specifically, the tracker documents policies that were adopted, administratively closed, or are currently pending during the time period from January 1, 2017 to July 1, 2018.

We hope this valuable resource is a useful tool for the Los Angeles food community, and for the food community more broadly.

Jonathan Gold

The stupendous, and entirely unique restaurant critic/food writer Jonathan Gold died last weekend.  Like for so many others, Gold’s reviews helped me to explore and engage with the vast and incredibly complex city of Los Angeles when I moved here two years ago.  Gold’s writing illustrates how food connects people to each other and to place, much as does Bourdain’s, and his death too is an enormous loss.

Here’s a piece of his from 1998 about the year he tried to eat at every restaurant on Pico Blvd.

 

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑