FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb Proposes Sweeping Label Updates – COMMENTS OPEN

by Diana Winters

On March 29, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb spoke at the Consumer Federation of America’s National Food Policy Conference about how the agency “can make further improvements in public health by both empowering consumers with information and facilitating industry innovation toward healthier foods that consumers want.” He focused not just on reducing chronic disease, but also on how better information can help to narrow nutrition and health disparities.

As to specific steps, Commissioner Gottlieb discussed: (1) modernizing health claims, (2) re-defining “healthy”, (3) changing the process by which the agency reviews qualified health claims, (4) clarifying the term “natural”, and (5) modernizing the names for ingredients, and standards of identity. He also talked about implementing the new nutrition facts label and menu labeling rules, and working on reducing sodium in foods.

You can watch the speech here.

For an administration committed to deregulation, Commissioner Gottlieb’s stance is surprising, and exciting. The Center for Science in the Public Interest provided FDA with some great preliminary suggestions for moving forward. I’m opening comments for this post – what do you think about Commissioner Gottlieb’s speech? What should or shouldn’t FDA do?

N.Y. Times on animal antibiotics in animal feed

There was a really interesting article on the use of antibiotics in animal feed in the N.Y. Times last week. Two very interesting takeaways: (1) the article highlights the flaws in FDA’s initiative to prohibit the use of antibiotic for growth promotion—as many critics noted, allowing companies to use these drugs for disease “prevention” is essentially a loophole, and (2) the market is eclipsing regulation in the context of antibiotics, as consumers increasingly demand antibiotic-free meat.

Further reading:

  • Emilie Aguirre wrote about California’s stricter rules and democratic experimentalism here.
  • Lisa Heinzerling wrote about the FDA’s poor record on animal antibiotics here.
  • I link to some resources on the background of this issue in a 2014 blog post, here.

Website Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑